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Keywords: Anglo-Russian Literary Society, Russian theme in English literature, the image of Russia, Anglo-Russian literary connections, popular literature.
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Arshinova I.V. The Russian Theme in English Novels and its Reception in the Reviews of the Anglo-Russian Literary Society. Studia Litterarum, 2020, vol. 5, no 4, pp. 506–517. (In Russ.)

https://doi.org/10.22455/2500-4247-2020-5-4-506-517

Author: I.V. Arshinova
Information about the author:

Irina V. Arshinova, Research Assistant, Institute of Russian Literature (the Pushkin House) of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Makarova emb. 4, 199034 St. Petersburg, Russia.

ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5947-3935

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Received: June 29, 2020
Published: December 25, 2020
Issue: 2020 Vol. 5, №4
Department: From the History of Literary Studies
Pages: 506-517
DOI:

https://doi.org/10.22455/2500-4247-2020-5-4-506-517

UDK: 821.111.0
BBK: 83.3(4Вел)5

Abstract

From the very beginning of its existence, Anglo-Russian Literary Society had D.M. Wallace’s following words as its motto. At the end of his his book Russia, he writes: “Meanwhile, our [as the English] duty is clear. We ought to know Russia better.” Eager promoter of Russian culture and literature since 1893, the Society nevertheless was ignoring popular English novels on Russian themes for quite a long time. In 1899, a “specially invited discussion” revealed the reason for this hostile silence: according to the Society, “the representation of Russian life in English novels had been misleading.” However, 10 years after its foundation, the Society began publishing reviews on these novels in its Proceedings. Moreover, the tone of these reviews may be described as moderately favorable. The analysis of the papers allows me to assume that this shift may be explained by the change of criteria applied to the novels (the criterion of “educativeness” was balanced by the criterion of entertainment): the popularizing function of these novels finally comes first.

References

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